Tag Archives: asthma

The Link Between Allergies And Depression

Depression can be the only symptom for some allergies

Depression and Allergic Reactions

Not All Allergy Symptoms Are Obvious

This winter, millions of Americans will become depressed because of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Symptoms of SAD include brain fog, anxiety, irritability, overeating, difficulty concentrating, and depression all of which are thought to occur because of the reduction in daylight. Allergy and asthma sufferers must be especially wary of depression during the winter, as recent studies suggest a strong link between allergies and depression.

A 2006 study at Columbia University’s School of Public Health showed that women with major depression are more likely to have allergies, and allergies appear to be more common in men with nervous, anxious personalities. Researchers cannot fully explain the link between allergies and depression, but they speculate that depression contributes to the development of allergies by impairing the immune system. Conversely, the stress of dealing with chronic allergies may lead to depression. Click to read more about the effects of allergens on your mental health.

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Hiking and Fall Allergies

Going for a weekend hike? Don’t forget your tissues!

Even though people associate spring with allergy season, fall can be just as potent. In fact, over 30% of people with seasonal allergies are affected by exercise-induced asthma. Because a nice hike is often out in the middle of nowhere, it’s important you take precautions. If you’re not sure what you’re allergic to, be sure you get tested for specific allergies so you know best how to prepare.

Get a work out in the fall

Hiking in the Fall

How to work out smart during fall allergy season:

  1. If you’re allergic to mold, avoid hiking or exercising in wet areas such as in the woods. Go for a nice stroll in a dry, arid location if possible.
  2. Temperature can play a big part. The colder the air, the more frequent the exercise-induced asthma. If you can’t avoid the cold, bring a scarf or something to warm the air before you inhale into your lungs.
  3. Check the pollen count online before you go to get a good idea of what’s out there.
  4. If you are going to a new area and you’re not familiar with the potential allergens, bring extra tissues and an epi pin to be safe. These items are very lightweight and can make a huge difference.
  5. Before you get back in your car or go back indoors, be sure to wipe off your shoes. That pollen can really accumulate and spread quickly!
  6. If it’s too much to handle, consider other healthy methods of exercise that are indoors: yoga, swimming, weight training, pop in your favorite Jillian Michaels DVD and sweat til you drop!

Be smart, know your body, and investigate your surroundings as much as possible. Fall is a beautiful season that is meant to be explored. With these precautions and tips, exercise-induced asthma and fall allergies won’t be your downfall!

Infants exposed to specific molds have higher asthma risk

Need help preventing asthma?

Do your children suffer from asthma? It may be preventable if it’s cause by mold or other environmental factors.

One in 10 children suffers from asthma but the potential environmental factors contributing to the disease are not well known. Cincinnati-based researchers now report new evidence that exposure to three types of mold during infancy may have a direct link to asthma development during childhood.  These forms of mold — Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus unguis and Penicillium variabile — are typically found growing in water-damaged homes, putting a spotlight on the importance of mold remediation for public health.

Click to read more about the results of environmental effects of allergies.

Reference: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802111502.htm

Asthma and Hay Fever

The Basics of Asthma, Hay Fever and How They Affect You:

The spring season marks the beginning of allergy season for many people.

Asthma is a condition consisting of recurrent attacks or shortness of breath, wheezing, and cough with expectoration of mucus. Hay fever typically consists of watery nasal discharge, itchy eyes and nose, and sneezing, and is usually associated with a particular season. In the United States, there is a rapid increase in the rate of diagnosing asthma, particularly among children. Many reasons may explain this increase including: an increase in the number of environmental chemical pollutants in the air, water, and food; an increase in the use of food additives; and for infants earlier weaning or earlier introduction to solid food.

Hay fever and asthma have similar causal factors and pathogenic tendencies in the body. Allergens can contribute to both of these conditions. The more allergens present, the more intense the reaction of the body. The severity of the response to allergens is also dependent on the nature of each individual’s system and how hypersensitive or overloaded with toxins it is. Though asthma is generally broken into two categories, extrinsic (an allergic reaction where there is an increase in allergic antibody) and intrinsic (a  reaction to a toxic chemical, cold air, exercise, infection) the physiology of the reactions is very similar.

Click to learn more about how to treat hay fever and asthma through proper eating, and physical and mental health.

Reference: http://www.namaskarhealing.com/articles