Thanksgiving Allergy Guide

The holiday season is rapidly approaching, and with it the inescapable march toward excessive food consumption is poised to begin. But those affected by food allergies need not retreat. While Thanksgiving may pose some challenges for the 12 million Americans with food sensitivities, it is still possible to enjoy the holiday. For starters, experts say, let go of your worries about hurting chef grandma’s feelings.

Allergic Reaction to Thanksgiving Dinner

Make sure you have a happy and safe Thanksgiving!

Since the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act took effect in 2006, foods regulated by the Food and Drug Administrationmust have labels that clearly establish the source of all ingredients that are — or are derived from — the eight most common food allergens: milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soybeans. These substances account for 90 percent of food reactions.

Click to read some super tips about how to keep your family safe and healthy while having a delicious Thanksgiving dinner!

Global warming may bring pollen onslaught

Does climate change affect your allergies?

Climate Change and Allergies

Climate change, we’ve all heard, is problematic. Major shifts in climate patterns in the future may affect the spread of disease, devastate coastal areas and cause the extinction of some of our beloved species of wildlife. It may even contribute to future violence. But if Hurricane Sandy didn’t bring climate change concerns home for you, here’s something else that might: Allergy mayhem.

Read more about new research presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) conference last week suggests that pollen counts are going to get a lot worse in the next 30 years. Dr. Leonard Bielory showed predictions that pollen counts will more than double by 2040.

Allergies and Corporate Wellness

Why Allergies Should Be Part Of Every Corporate Wellness Plan

Allergies and Corporate Wellness

There’s a better way to deal with allergens in the office!

The average allergy patient spends approximately ten times the amount on over-the-counter allergy medications and prescriptions during their lifetime than they would on getting a simple over the counter test, such as MyAllergyTest.

It’s possible to create a comfortable allergy-free zone in your own home, but what about other environments? What if, for example, you’re allergic to your workplace?

The average office environment may be a hotbed of allergy triggers. From pungent chemicals to mold in the ductwork to a co-worker’s aftershave, culprits can seek out and target unsuspecting office dwellers.

And because allergies can make people feel pretty miserable, proof of their allergy struggles may begin to show up in their job performance.

Who, after all, can concentrate on work when they’re contending with watery, burning eyes and a pounding headache? Maybe allergy-related fatigue threatens to crush their productivity.

It’s important to tackle the allergen problem before it takes over your office … and gets the best of your staff. What are the net benefits?

  • reduce sick days associated with allergies
  • decrease costs associated with allergic reactions and medications
  • permanently desensitize you to specific allergies

 

Sources:

http://corporatewellnessadvisor.com/daily/employee-health-programs/attacking-allergies/

http://www.corporatewellnessprogram.net/allergy-testing-and-immunotherapy/

Allergies and Cancer

Some studies suggest that those who suffer from allergies are less prone to cancer than their hay-fever-free friends. The mysterious connection between the immune system and cancer could help researchers fight the disease.

Do allergies lower your risk for cancer?

When you sneeze, allergens and carcinogens are expelled from the tissues, possibly protecting the body’s cells from harmful mutation.

Since the 1950s, scientists have drawn three conclusions about the relation between allergies and cancer: Compared with people who don’t have allergies, allergy sufferers have (1) a higher risk of cancer, (2) a lower risk of cancer and (3) the same risk of cancer.

A recent review of the studies, published by scientists at Cornell University, pinpoints a nuance that could explain the apparent contradiction. Click to learn more about the possible link between allergies and decreased risk of cancer.

 

 

10 Point Halloween Allergy Plan For Your Child

Kids love Halloween. How do parents make sure their kids are safe from allergies on Halloween? Here is a plan to help.

Food allergies at Halloween

Protect Your Ghosts and Goblins From Allergies!

  1. First and foremost is prevention. If you’re not sure what your children are allergic to, you can’t prevent a reaction. You can get tested at your doctor’s office or perhaps it’s more convenient and affordable to purchase a home allergy test kit.
  2. Your child should needs to know what treats they are taking. If he or she is allergic to wheat, only gluten-free goodies are allowed! Here are some great recipes for gluten-free treats specifically for Halloween.
  3. Talk to parents and teachers about providing non-candy treats such as haunting stickers, witch finger puppets, spider rings or glow in the dark ghost stickers. They are many fun things that your child may enjoy even more than candy and will definitely last longer.
  4. Review the labels of any treats your child brings home. The terms can be confusing sometimes so if there’s an ingredient you don’t recognize be sure to look it up first.
  5. Make-up can trigger skin allergies so be sure to investigate their face paint before applying it.
  6. If your loved one is going to a haunted house, get the details first as fog machines can trigger allergic reactions and asthma.
  7. When you get out Halloween decorations from last year or a hand-me-down costume, wipe them down and wash them off first. They may be dusty or even have mold spores depending on where they were stored.
  8. Pumpkin patches can harbor mold in damp areas. It may be best to head to your local farmer’s market for a pre-picked pumpkin that you can take home and wash before the carving ensues.
  9. If your kid is not too embarrassed, accompany them to any Halloween events they participate in (classroom party, trick-or-treating, haunted house). If they are embarrassed, be sure they are educated enough to be safe or make a parental executive decision that’s best for your family.
  10. Be sure to carry an epi pin or your child’s allergy plan just in case.

Have a happy and safe Halloween!

Sources: http://www.acaai.org/allergist/news/New/Pages/Halloween-Fun.aspx                                                                                                 http://news.yahoo.com/top-tricks-managing-food-allergies-halloween-110223346.html

 

Hiking and Fall Allergies

Going for a weekend hike? Don’t forget your tissues!

Even though people associate spring with allergy season, fall can be just as potent. In fact, over 30% of people with seasonal allergies are affected by exercise-induced asthma. Because a nice hike is often out in the middle of nowhere, it’s important you take precautions. If you’re not sure what you’re allergic to, be sure you get tested for specific allergies so you know best how to prepare.

Get a work out in the fall

Hiking in the Fall

How to work out smart during fall allergy season:

  1. If you’re allergic to mold, avoid hiking or exercising in wet areas such as in the woods. Go for a nice stroll in a dry, arid location if possible.
  2. Temperature can play a big part. The colder the air, the more frequent the exercise-induced asthma. If you can’t avoid the cold, bring a scarf or something to warm the air before you inhale into your lungs.
  3. Check the pollen count online before you go to get a good idea of what’s out there.
  4. If you are going to a new area and you’re not familiar with the potential allergens, bring extra tissues and an epi pin to be safe. These items are very lightweight and can make a huge difference.
  5. Before you get back in your car or go back indoors, be sure to wipe off your shoes. That pollen can really accumulate and spread quickly!
  6. If it’s too much to handle, consider other healthy methods of exercise that are indoors: yoga, swimming, weight training, pop in your favorite Jillian Michaels DVD and sweat til you drop!

Be smart, know your body, and investigate your surroundings as much as possible. Fall is a beautiful season that is meant to be explored. With these precautions and tips, exercise-induced asthma and fall allergies won’t be your downfall!

10 Worst Places for Fall Allergies in 2012

In what cities are pollen, mold, allergy medications, and certified allergists most prevalent?

MyAllergyTest Helps Allergy Sufferers in Louisville

Fall is prime allergy season in the Ohio Valley

Some natives of Louisville, Ky., needn’t be surprised if they’re sneezing while reading this article. Their city tops the list this year as the worst place to live in the U.S. for fall allergies.  To earn the No. 1 spot, Louisville received a “worse than average” rating for its pollen counts and allergy medication use by each patient. But it got a “better than average” rating for the number of allergy specialists available in the area.

The rankings are based on an analysis of three key factors: pollen and mold scores during fall 2011, the number of allergy medications used by people with allergies last fall, and the number of board-certified allergists per 10,000 patients.

Click to find out this year’s 10 worst places for fall allergies.