Category Archives: Summer Allergies

Free Allergy Screenings!

Free allergy screenings will be available from 11am-3pm on September 24th using ImmuneTech’s Allergy Test at Giant Eagle Grocery Store locations, sponsored by Giant Eagle and Allegra.

Check to see if there is a location near you. If there is not a free screening in your area, you click to order your low-cost allergy test. Use discount code “ILG” at checkout for 15% off!

4300 Kent Road, State Route 59, Stow, OH 44224, (330) 686-7829

6493 Strip Avenue N.W., North, Canton, OH 44720, (330) 497-7902

351 Center Street, Chardon, OH 44024, (440) 286-4949

8515 Tanglewood Square, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023, (440) 543-5144

2201 Kresge Drive, Amherst, OH 44001, (440) 282-7614

4747 Sawmill Road, Columbus, OH 43220, (614) 923-0475

873 Refugee Road, Pickerington, OH 43147, (614) 866-3693

344 Goucher Street, Johnstown, PA 15905, (814) 288-6918

4010 Monroeville Boulevard, Monroeville, PA 15146, (412) 372-1220

1671 Butler Plank Road, Glenshaw, PA 15116, (412) 961-0614

4007 Washington Road, McMurray, PA 15317, (724) 941-7220

9880 Olde US 20, Rossford, OH 43460-1716, (419) 874-2415

100 N Main Street, DuBois, PA 15801, (814) 375-3708

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Ragweed allergies lasting longer due to climate change!

Do your seasonal allergies seem to last longer now? Its not just your imagination! Given the millions of allergy sufferers held hostage by the drippy noses, burning, watery eyes, and continuous sneezing sessions it induces, ragweed may be one of the most hated plants on the planet.

A recent study, led by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), in collaboration with Rutgers, has confirmed a link between seasonal warming and a longer ragweed season in some parts of central North America.

“The main takeaway is that we are already seeing a significant increase in the season length of ragweed; and that this increase in season length is associated with a greater warming at northern latitudes, consistent with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projections regarding climate change,” explains lead study author Lewis Ziska, PhD, research plant physiologist with USDA’s Crop Systems and Global Change Lab.

Researchers used ragweed pollen and temperature data recorded between the late 1990s and 2005 in 10 different locations in the U.S. and Canada and found that in all but two of the areas analyzed, the ragweed pollen season increased—in some cases by nearly a month. The lengthening of the allergy season coincides with an increase in warmer, frost-free days. Researchers noticed a general trend—the ragweed allergy season grew longest in the higher latitudes of the northern United States and Canada.

Ragweed is one of the most common weed allergens, affecting about 10 percent of the population.

Ragweed

Among allergy sufferers, nearly a third endure hay fever misery brought on by ragweed pollen. Under normal circumstances, a single ragweed plant creates 1 million pollen grains; but a climate change–charged, more CO2-rich environment boosts that number to upwards of 3 to 4 million pollen grains per plant, according to Clifford Bassett, MD, medical director of Allergy and Asthma Care of New York and a member of the public-education committee at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

Here are some solutions to help you survive ragweed allergies:

• Make sure you’re actually allergic to ragweed. It may sound silly, but allergists recommend being tested to confirm you’re allergic to what you actually think is making you sneeze. ImmuneTech offers a home test kit for ragweed and other allergens; visit www.immunetech.com to order yours today. For a 15% discount, use code ILG at checkout.

• Plan vacations accordingly. For many people, February still marks the cold season, months away from the miserableness of hay fever symptoms. But take your ragweed allergy into consideration as you plan this year’s summer or fall getaway. Pollen counts are generally lower around water. So if you vacation during prime ragweed season—summer and fall, or year-round in places like Florida or Hawaii—plan some time on the beach or around rivers and lakes for some ragweed relief.

• Create better indoor air. While houseplants can’t rid your air of pollens you’re allergic to, certain houseplants can counteract indoor air pollution that further aggravates your allergy problem.

References:

http://www.rodale.com/ragweed-allergy-0

http://news.rutgers.edu/medrel/news-releases/2011/03/seasonal-warming-lea-20110316