Category Archives: ImmuneTech

Allergy Expert Warns Airlines Are ‘Risking Lives’

Airlines may be putting lives at risk by showing a lack of interest in catering for the needs of passengers with certain food allergies.

Dr Jane Lucas, a respiratory and allergy specialist at Southampton General Hospital, said flights were a particular danger to sufferers due to inconsistent information provided by companies and called on them to take responsibility for their customers.  She spoke out following a study, published in the journal Clinical and Translational Allergy, which looked at the experiences of 32 patients with nut or peanut allergy and how they cope with travel.

Click to read more about the study on allergy sufferer on airplanes or click to find out if you are suffering from allergies so you can learn what precautions are necessary both in the air and on the ground.

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The Most Common Fall Allergies and How to Prevent Them

Most people think of spring as the main allergy season, but fall can be terrible too, especially with the hotter than normal temperatures much of the country is experiencing.

Do you have a cold or is it fall allergies? Experiencing symptoms such as sneezing, sniffles, trouble sleeping, and itchy skin, eyes, nose, or throat? What can you do about fall allergy season? The first step is education and the second step is prevention. You need to be educated on what causes the autumnal allergies. Here are the 3 most common allergy triggers:

  1. Ragweed
  2. Dust Mites
  3. Mold

Now to prevent experiencing allergic reactions based on the top triggers, do the following:

      Ragweed:  If possible avoid being outdoors from 5am-10am on hot, dry windy days. If you must be outside, wear a mask. Don’t worry they are very stylish – more so than a runny nose and red, irritated eyes anyway! The ragweed count in the air is highest at this time. No ragweed in your area? Beware – it can travel up to 400 miles through the air from the location of the actual plant.
Ragweed Pollen

Ragweed allergies are common from mid-August through the end of November

  1. Dust Mites: Wash your sheets! I know your mom has told you this many times, but really, it could actually improve your daily well-being. Remove and/or clean anything that just sits there: stuffed animals (I know they have sentimental value…), artwork, curtains, carpet, etc and definitely get some dust mite covers. These are low-cost and worth it.

    Prevent Dust Mite Allergies

    A dust mite cover is the simplest way to prevent dust mite allergies

  2. Mold: Guess what? Mold spores all over fallen leaves. If you have leaves in your yard, you or your family may be suffering. This is especially common for kids who love to play in the leaves.

    Fall allergies from fall leaves

    As pretty as these fall leaves are, they can cause allergic reactions!

If you’re not sure if you have a cold or allergies, it would be wise to consider getting tested. You can get tested at your doctor’s office or you can order a simple allergy test at home.

Worst Cities for Spring Allergies in 2012

Where are the worst places to live for allergies?
The third time is said to be the charm. But it’s doubtful the allergy sufferers in Knoxville find it charming that for a third consecutive year their East Tennessee city has earned the No. 1 spot on the list of the worst places to live with spring allergies.

Several factors are considered when ranking each of the 100 largest metro areas, including pollen scores, number of allergy medicines used per patient, and the number of board-certified allergists per patient.

To top the list, Knoxville had “worse than average” pollen counts as well as utilization rates for allergy medications. But it received an “average” score on its number of allergy specialists available to treat patients with allergy-related symptoms, from runny noses and frequent sneezing to watery eyes and sinus congestion.

Click to read the top 10 list of worst cities for spring allergies.

Source: http://www.webmd.com/allergies/news/20120319/worst-cities-spring-allergies-2012?ecd=wnl_aaa_032612

What Causes Allergies and Why Are Some of Us More Susceptible?

What causes allergies?

What causes allergies is a question that may frequently occur to those of us who have allergies and who often have their activities and life constrained by those allergies. An allergy is a hypersensitivity disorder of the immune system. To put it simply, the body overreacts to harmless substances, perceiving them to be harmful.

Many kinds of foods, dust, pollen, medications, dander from pets and other animals and insect bites are usually not inimical to the body. But those who have an allergy to any of these substances are unable to tolerate these ‘allergens’ and produce reactions that could range from the mild to the severe. The body mistakenly produces the reaction that it would normally have to harmful bacteria and viruses.

What causes allergies may differ from person to person – the triggers, allergens, the kind of allergic reactions and their severity and so on. Also allergies can show a predictable pattern at times. For instance it a person is allergic to peanuts, there is a higher likelihood that they may be allergic to other nuts as well.

Medical conditions can be causes for allergies

Click to learn more about causes of allergies.

Source: http://www.allergyasthmazone.com/allergy/what-causes-allergies/

Sam’s Club Event!

ImmuneTech partnered with Sam’s Club to provide screenings for customers in their stores. Check out these photos from the Lithonia, GA store! To order your at-home allergy test kit, click here.

Food Allergy: A National and Deadly Problem

Do you wonder if you or your child might have food allergies?

Don’t guess, test! ImmuneTech offers a blood test for 10 of the most common allergens that is accessible and affordable. It’s a simple process. Order the test kit, prick your finger at home, return the test kit with your sample, and your test results are accessed using a secure log-in online. This test has been FDA cleared and proficiency demonstrated by the College of American Pathology. Visit www.immunetech.com to order your test kit today.

The following is an excellent article by Special to American News Report on February 21, 2012.

“Max Rosland, a 7-year-old elementary school student from Carter Lake, Iowa, was placed on a heart-lung bypass machine last month because of a severe allergic reaction to a peanut he ate at school. He survived. Ammaria Johnson, a first-grader from Richmond, Virginia went into anaphylactic shock and tragically died January 2 after eating a peanut her classmate gave her during recess.

The frequent and harrowing stories of food allergies have prompted a national outcry for schools to carry epinephrine (an emergency medicine that combats allergic reaction) and for parents to have their children tested for food allergies.

“This type of tragedy happens more often than you think,” said Darshana Alle, MD, an immunologist certified with the American Board of Allergy and Immunology, and practicing physician with the Allergy and Asthma Care Centers in Arlington, Virginia. “It’s something that parents and schools must be prepared to address.”

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) reports that food allergies alone cause 30,000 anaphylactic shock episodes and 140 deaths each year.

Anaphylaxis: The Potentially Deadly Allergic Reaction

The most dreaded manifestation of food allergy is anaphylaxis, a rapid-onset allergic reaction that can cause death. It most commonly presents with skin, respiratory, cardiac or gastrointestinal symptoms, where at least two organ systems are affected. If the cardiovascular system is affected, it can lead to potential shock and death. Anaphylaxis is always a medical emergency.

Click to read more about steps parents can take to avoid tragedy.

Reference site: http://americannewsreport.com/food-allergy-a-national-and-deadly-problem-8813227.html

What Does a Severe Allergic Reaction Look Like?

Symptoms of food allergies
“The question that makes parents of severely food-allergic kids lose the most sleep: how will they know when their child is experiencing what could be a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction.

Note: STOP right here if you are reading this because you believe that your child is experiencing a severe reaction. Step away from the computer and follow your doctor’s emergency instructions (such as administering the EpiPen and calling 911.)

OK–so back to the question. This is a wonderful thing to discuss with your doctor because symptoms vary depending on the person. If your child has experienced only “mild” reactions in the past, be sure to get very clear details from your allergist about what to look for.

If you see the following symptoms, it may indicate a food allergy reaction:

Skin problems
Throat tightness
Itchy skin rashes (eczema, also called dermatitis)
Swelling
Breathing problems
Light-headedness


Click to read about additional symptoms and signs of allergic reactions.

Resource: http://nut-freemom.blogspot.com/2012/02/food-allergy-review-what-does-severe.html