Category Archives: Egg Allergy

Helping People with Food Issues to Have a Great Life—The Super Allergy Cookbook

As a life-long food allergy sufferer, and the parent of three food-allergic children, author and speaker Lisa Lundy writes and speaks from experience in her extraordinary cookbook dedicated to improving the lives of the more than 75 million Americans suffering from various food intolerances and sensitivities, the 2.2 million American celiac (gluten) disease sufferers, and 12 million Americans faced with life-threatening food allergies.

More than a cookbook, this publication is actually the definitive textbook on the study of cooking for (and living with) food allergies, celiac disease, and intolerances. Whether you or someone you know are allergic to gluten (wheat), casein (dairy), lactose, eggs, nuts, or other foods, Lisa’s book offers cooking tips and a survival guide to what you should and should not eat. Overall, there are 225 recipes and over 100 pages of useful information to help you get your life back!

Her Mission:

  • To empower adults and parents in the area of food, food allergies, celiac disease, the gluten-free diet, the gluten-free/ casein-free diet, and health in general.
  • To provide resources, products, recipes and information on these topics that will help consumers, practitioners, and organizations.
  • To help you be able to bake and cook great foods for you and your family minus the offending gluten, dairy, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, or other allergens.

Check out her website at www.superallergycookbook.com to purchase your copy!

Food Allergy: A National and Deadly Problem

Do you wonder if you or your child might have food allergies?

Don’t guess, test! ImmuneTech offers a blood test for 10 of the most common allergens that is accessible and affordable. It’s a simple process. Order the test kit, prick your finger at home, return the test kit with your sample, and your test results are accessed using a secure log-in online. This test has been FDA cleared and proficiency demonstrated by the College of American Pathology. Visit www.immunetech.com to order your test kit today.

The following is an excellent article by Special to American News Report on February 21, 2012.

“Max Rosland, a 7-year-old elementary school student from Carter Lake, Iowa, was placed on a heart-lung bypass machine last month because of a severe allergic reaction to a peanut he ate at school. He survived. Ammaria Johnson, a first-grader from Richmond, Virginia went into anaphylactic shock and tragically died January 2 after eating a peanut her classmate gave her during recess.

The frequent and harrowing stories of food allergies have prompted a national outcry for schools to carry epinephrine (an emergency medicine that combats allergic reaction) and for parents to have their children tested for food allergies.

“This type of tragedy happens more often than you think,” said Darshana Alle, MD, an immunologist certified with the American Board of Allergy and Immunology, and practicing physician with the Allergy and Asthma Care Centers in Arlington, Virginia. “It’s something that parents and schools must be prepared to address.”

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) reports that food allergies alone cause 30,000 anaphylactic shock episodes and 140 deaths each year.

Anaphylaxis: The Potentially Deadly Allergic Reaction

The most dreaded manifestation of food allergy is anaphylaxis, a rapid-onset allergic reaction that can cause death. It most commonly presents with skin, respiratory, cardiac or gastrointestinal symptoms, where at least two organ systems are affected. If the cardiovascular system is affected, it can lead to potential shock and death. Anaphylaxis is always a medical emergency.

Click to read more about steps parents can take to avoid tragedy.

Reference site: http://americannewsreport.com/food-allergy-a-national-and-deadly-problem-8813227.html

Shopping Smart: With food allergies, reading and understanding labels is key

How do you know if a packaged food contains an allergen?
Food allergies can get confusing and complicated. More than 11 million Americans suffer from food allergies; and predictions are that the incidence of food allergies is on the increase.

A recent study in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology showed that seafood allergies are more likely to begin in adulthood, and the Journal estimates that 6.5 million Americans have a seafood allergy today.

Just eight food groups account for 90 percent of allergic reactions. These include peanuts, tree nuts (walnuts, pecans, etc.), fish, shellfish, eggs, milk, soy and wheat. There are myriad other things that can cause allergies for some people, including food additives such as aspartame or sulfites.

Click to read more about these food groups and help ordering at a restaurant.

Source: http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/food/10510866-423/shopping-smart-with-food-allergies-reading-and-understanding-labels-is-key.html#.TzrlmySrJNQ.wordpress

Free Allergy Screenings!

Free allergy screenings will be available from 11am-3pm on September 24th using ImmuneTech’s Allergy Test at Giant Eagle Grocery Store locations, sponsored by Giant Eagle and Allegra.

Check to see if there is a location near you. If there is not a free screening in your area, you click to order your low-cost allergy test. Use discount code “ILG” at checkout for 15% off!

4300 Kent Road, State Route 59, Stow, OH 44224, (330) 686-7829

6493 Strip Avenue N.W., North, Canton, OH 44720, (330) 497-7902

351 Center Street, Chardon, OH 44024, (440) 286-4949

8515 Tanglewood Square, Chagrin Falls, OH 44023, (440) 543-5144

2201 Kresge Drive, Amherst, OH 44001, (440) 282-7614

4747 Sawmill Road, Columbus, OH 43220, (614) 923-0475

873 Refugee Road, Pickerington, OH 43147, (614) 866-3693

344 Goucher Street, Johnstown, PA 15905, (814) 288-6918

4010 Monroeville Boulevard, Monroeville, PA 15146, (412) 372-1220

1671 Butler Plank Road, Glenshaw, PA 15116, (412) 961-0614

4007 Washington Road, McMurray, PA 15317, (724) 941-7220

9880 Olde US 20, Rossford, OH 43460-1716, (419) 874-2415

100 N Main Street, DuBois, PA 15801, (814) 375-3708

Suspecting the Egg?

Egg Allergies

Egg is one of the most common causes of food allergy. It is estimated that most children outgrow egg allergy by the age of five, but some people remain allergic for a lifetime. The egg is made up of many different proteins, some of which are allergenic and others which are not. Most people with an egg allergy are allergic to the egg white proteins, others are allergic to the yolk, and some are allergic to both.

The most commonly reported symptoms seen with this kind of allergy include: atopic dermatitis (eczema) , urticaria (hives) , asthmaallergic rhinitis , anaphylactic shock and digestive symptoms.

If you suffer from an egg allergy, strictly avoiding eggs and food containing egg and egg products is the only way to prevent a reaction. But, it is not always easy to avoid these foods since many unsuspecting products contain eggs. Be sure to confirm a suspected egg allergy. To find out if you have egg allergies, order your test from ImmuneTech and find out for sure.. For a 15% discount, use code: ILG at checkout.

All FDA-regulated manufactured food products that contain egg as an ingredient are required by US Law to list the word “egg” on the product label. Always check the label ingredients before you use a product. In addition, check the label each time you buy the product. Manufacturers occasionally change recipes, and a trigger food may be added to the new recipe. Also, keep in mind that some egg substitutes contain egg white.

Avoid foods that contain eggs or any of these ingredients: albumin (also spelled albumen), apovitellenin, egg (dried, powdered, solids, white, yolk), eggnog, globulin, lecithin, livetin, lysozyme, mayonnaise, meringue (meringue powder), ovalbumin, ovoglobulin, ovomucin, ovomucoid, ovotransferrin, ovovitellin, phosvitin, and silici albuminate, simplesse, surimi, and vitellin.

Egg is sometimes found in the following: baked goods, egg substitutes, lecithin, macaroni, marzipan, marshmallows, nougat, and pasta. Eggs have been used to create the foam or milk topping on specialty coffee drinks and are used in some bar drinks. Some commercial brands of egg substitutes contain egg whites. Most commercially processed cooked pastas (including those used in prepared foods such as soup) contain egg or are processed on equipment shared with egg-containing pastas. Boxed, dry pastas are usually egg-free, but may be processed on equipment that is also used for egg-containing products. Fresh pasta is sometimes egg-free, too. Read the label or ask about ingredients before eating pasta. Egg wash is sometimes used on pretzels before they are dipped in salt. Of course, these examples highlight some places where eggs have been unexpectedly found (i.e., on a food label for a specific product, in a restaurant meal, in creative cookery, etc.) These examples do not imply that eggs are always present in these foods; it is intended to serve as a reminder to always read the label and ask questions about ingredients before eating a food that you have not prepared yourself.

Additionally, if you see the following statements on a label, the food may be cross-contaminated with egg. These warnings are generally voluntary, so some manufacturers may not include this information, even if there is egg present in their facility:

  • “may contain eggs”
  • “produced on shared equipment with eggs”
  • “produced in a facility that also processes eggs”

Keep in mind that individuals with egg allergy should also avoid eggs from duck, turkey, goose, quail, etc. as these are known to be cross-reactive with chicken egg.

If you’re included to bake or cook at home, there are some easy egg-free substitutes to use. For each egg, substitute one of the following in recipes. These substitutes work well when baking from scratch and substituting 1 to 3 eggs.

  • 1 tsp. baking powder, 1 T. liquid, 1 T. vinegar
  • 1 tsp. yeast dissolved in 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 1/2 T. water, 1 1/2 T. oil, 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 packet gelatin, 2 T. warm water. Do not mix until ready to use.

Commonly Asked Questions about Egg Allergy

Can an MMR Vaccine be given to an individual with an egg allergy?
The recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) acknowledge that the MMR vaccine can be safely administered to all patients with egg allergy. The AAP recommendations have been based, in part, on scientific evidence supporting the routine use of one-dose administration of the MMR vaccine to egg-allergic patients. This includes those patients with a history of severe, generalized anaphylactic reactions to egg.

I’ve heard the flu vaccine contains egg, is this true?
Yes, influenza vaccines usually contain a small amount of egg protein.

Is a flu shot safe for an individual with an egg allergy?
Influenza vaccines are grown on egg embryos and may contain a small amount of egg protein. If you or your child is allergic to eggs, speak to your doctor before receiving a flu shot.

References and for additional information:

http://www.foodallergy.org/page/egg-allergy

http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=20&cont=523

http://www.webmd.com/allergies/guide/egg-allergy

http://foodallergies.about.com/od/eggallergies/qt/eggfreediet.htm