Category Archives: Allergy Overview

Global warming may bring pollen onslaught

Does climate change affect your allergies?

Climate Change and Allergies

Climate change, we’ve all heard, is problematic. Major shifts in climate patterns in the future may affect the spread of disease, devastate coastal areas and cause the extinction of some of our beloved species of wildlife. It may even contribute to future violence. But if Hurricane Sandy didn’t bring climate change concerns home for you, here’s something else that might: Allergy mayhem.

Read more about new research presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) conference last week suggests that pollen counts are going to get a lot worse in the next 30 years. Dr. Leonard Bielory showed predictions that pollen counts will more than double by 2040.

Advertisements

Allergies and Cancer

Some studies suggest that those who suffer from allergies are less prone to cancer than their hay-fever-free friends. The mysterious connection between the immune system and cancer could help researchers fight the disease.

Do allergies lower your risk for cancer?

When you sneeze, allergens and carcinogens are expelled from the tissues, possibly protecting the body’s cells from harmful mutation.

Since the 1950s, scientists have drawn three conclusions about the relation between allergies and cancer: Compared with people who don’t have allergies, allergy sufferers have (1) a higher risk of cancer, (2) a lower risk of cancer and (3) the same risk of cancer.

A recent review of the studies, published by scientists at Cornell University, pinpoints a nuance that could explain the apparent contradiction. Click to learn more about the possible link between allergies and decreased risk of cancer.

 

 

10 Point Halloween Allergy Plan For Your Child

Kids love Halloween. How do parents make sure their kids are safe from allergies on Halloween? Here is a plan to help.

Food allergies at Halloween

Protect Your Ghosts and Goblins From Allergies!

  1. First and foremost is prevention. If you’re not sure what your children are allergic to, you can’t prevent a reaction. You can get tested at your doctor’s office or perhaps it’s more convenient and affordable to purchase a home allergy test kit.
  2. Your child should needs to know what treats they are taking. If he or she is allergic to wheat, only gluten-free goodies are allowed! Here are some great recipes for gluten-free treats specifically for Halloween.
  3. Talk to parents and teachers about providing non-candy treats such as haunting stickers, witch finger puppets, spider rings or glow in the dark ghost stickers. They are many fun things that your child may enjoy even more than candy and will definitely last longer.
  4. Review the labels of any treats your child brings home. The terms can be confusing sometimes so if there’s an ingredient you don’t recognize be sure to look it up first.
  5. Make-up can trigger skin allergies so be sure to investigate their face paint before applying it.
  6. If your loved one is going to a haunted house, get the details first as fog machines can trigger allergic reactions and asthma.
  7. When you get out Halloween decorations from last year or a hand-me-down costume, wipe them down and wash them off first. They may be dusty or even have mold spores depending on where they were stored.
  8. Pumpkin patches can harbor mold in damp areas. It may be best to head to your local farmer’s market for a pre-picked pumpkin that you can take home and wash before the carving ensues.
  9. If your kid is not too embarrassed, accompany them to any Halloween events they participate in (classroom party, trick-or-treating, haunted house). If they are embarrassed, be sure they are educated enough to be safe or make a parental executive decision that’s best for your family.
  10. Be sure to carry an epi pin or your child’s allergy plan just in case.

Have a happy and safe Halloween!

Sources: http://www.acaai.org/allergist/news/New/Pages/Halloween-Fun.aspx                                                                                                 http://news.yahoo.com/top-tricks-managing-food-allergies-halloween-110223346.html

 

10 Worst Places for Fall Allergies in 2012

In what cities are pollen, mold, allergy medications, and certified allergists most prevalent?

MyAllergyTest Helps Allergy Sufferers in Louisville

Fall is prime allergy season in the Ohio Valley

Some natives of Louisville, Ky., needn’t be surprised if they’re sneezing while reading this article. Their city tops the list this year as the worst place to live in the U.S. for fall allergies.  To earn the No. 1 spot, Louisville received a “worse than average” rating for its pollen counts and allergy medication use by each patient. But it got a “better than average” rating for the number of allergy specialists available in the area.

The rankings are based on an analysis of three key factors: pollen and mold scores during fall 2011, the number of allergy medications used by people with allergies last fall, and the number of board-certified allergists per 10,000 patients.

Click to find out this year’s 10 worst places for fall allergies.

Infants exposed to specific molds have higher asthma risk

Need help preventing asthma?

Do your children suffer from asthma? It may be preventable if it’s cause by mold or other environmental factors.

One in 10 children suffers from asthma but the potential environmental factors contributing to the disease are not well known. Cincinnati-based researchers now report new evidence that exposure to three types of mold during infancy may have a direct link to asthma development during childhood.  These forms of mold — Aspergillus ochraceus, Aspergillus unguis and Penicillium variabile — are typically found growing in water-damaged homes, putting a spotlight on the importance of mold remediation for public health.

Click to read more about the results of environmental effects of allergies.

Reference: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120802111502.htm

City Kids More Likely to Have Food Allergies Than Rural Ones: Population Density Is Key Factor, Study Finds

Urban areas increase chance for allergies in kids

Children living in urban centers have a much higher prevalence of food allergies than those living in rural areas, according to a new study, which is the first to map children’s food allergies by geographical location in the United States. In particular, kids in big cities are more than twice as likely to have peanut and shellfish allergies compared to rural communities. Click to read more about the affect of allergies in cities.

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120607105858.htm

Allergies? Some Pollens Are Much More Aggressive Than Others

The allergic potential of pollens is greater than we could have imagined.

There are pollens — and there are pollens, as scientists from across Europe discovered while investigating the allergic potential of pollens from the three main triggers of hay fever in Europe: birch, grass and olive. Different people can have very different allergic reactions to a particular type of pollen, however, and as the Hialine study researchers have now found, the allergenicity of the pollens also varies. Depending on the time of year and region, the pollens produce different quantities of protein compounds. These are ultimately responsible for the allergic immune reaction.

Up until now, the only way to ascertain how seriously patients will be affected is by measuring the airborne pollen concentration. However, this method gives very little indication of how aggressive the pollens are. Read more about the intensity of certain pollens.

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120521115520.htm