Monthly Archives: February 2012

Helping People with Food Issues to Have a Great Life—The Super Allergy Cookbook

As a life-long food allergy sufferer, and the parent of three food-allergic children, author and speaker Lisa Lundy writes and speaks from experience in her extraordinary cookbook dedicated to improving the lives of the more than 75 million Americans suffering from various food intolerances and sensitivities, the 2.2 million American celiac (gluten) disease sufferers, and 12 million Americans faced with life-threatening food allergies.

More than a cookbook, this publication is actually the definitive textbook on the study of cooking for (and living with) food allergies, celiac disease, and intolerances. Whether you or someone you know are allergic to gluten (wheat), casein (dairy), lactose, eggs, nuts, or other foods, Lisa’s book offers cooking tips and a survival guide to what you should and should not eat. Overall, there are 225 recipes and over 100 pages of useful information to help you get your life back!

Her Mission:

  • To empower adults and parents in the area of food, food allergies, celiac disease, the gluten-free diet, the gluten-free/ casein-free diet, and health in general.
  • To provide resources, products, recipes and information on these topics that will help consumers, practitioners, and organizations.
  • To help you be able to bake and cook great foods for you and your family minus the offending gluten, dairy, eggs, tree nuts, peanuts, or other allergens.

Check out her website at www.superallergycookbook.com to purchase your copy!

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Food Allergy: A National and Deadly Problem

Do you wonder if you or your child might have food allergies?

Don’t guess, test! ImmuneTech offers a blood test for 10 of the most common allergens that is accessible and affordable. It’s a simple process. Order the test kit, prick your finger at home, return the test kit with your sample, and your test results are accessed using a secure log-in online. This test has been FDA cleared and proficiency demonstrated by the College of American Pathology. Visit www.immunetech.com to order your test kit today.

The following is an excellent article by Special to American News Report on February 21, 2012.

“Max Rosland, a 7-year-old elementary school student from Carter Lake, Iowa, was placed on a heart-lung bypass machine last month because of a severe allergic reaction to a peanut he ate at school. He survived. Ammaria Johnson, a first-grader from Richmond, Virginia went into anaphylactic shock and tragically died January 2 after eating a peanut her classmate gave her during recess.

The frequent and harrowing stories of food allergies have prompted a national outcry for schools to carry epinephrine (an emergency medicine that combats allergic reaction) and for parents to have their children tested for food allergies.

“This type of tragedy happens more often than you think,” said Darshana Alle, MD, an immunologist certified with the American Board of Allergy and Immunology, and practicing physician with the Allergy and Asthma Care Centers in Arlington, Virginia. “It’s something that parents and schools must be prepared to address.”

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) reports that food allergies alone cause 30,000 anaphylactic shock episodes and 140 deaths each year.

Anaphylaxis: The Potentially Deadly Allergic Reaction

The most dreaded manifestation of food allergy is anaphylaxis, a rapid-onset allergic reaction that can cause death. It most commonly presents with skin, respiratory, cardiac or gastrointestinal symptoms, where at least two organ systems are affected. If the cardiovascular system is affected, it can lead to potential shock and death. Anaphylaxis is always a medical emergency.

Click to read more about steps parents can take to avoid tragedy.

Reference site: http://americannewsreport.com/food-allergy-a-national-and-deadly-problem-8813227.html

What Does a Severe Allergic Reaction Look Like?

Symptoms of food allergies
“The question that makes parents of severely food-allergic kids lose the most sleep: how will they know when their child is experiencing what could be a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction.

Note: STOP right here if you are reading this because you believe that your child is experiencing a severe reaction. Step away from the computer and follow your doctor’s emergency instructions (such as administering the EpiPen and calling 911.)

OK–so back to the question. This is a wonderful thing to discuss with your doctor because symptoms vary depending on the person. If your child has experienced only “mild” reactions in the past, be sure to get very clear details from your allergist about what to look for.

If you see the following symptoms, it may indicate a food allergy reaction:

Skin problems
Throat tightness
Itchy skin rashes (eczema, also called dermatitis)
Swelling
Breathing problems
Light-headedness


Click to read about additional symptoms and signs of allergic reactions.

Resource: http://nut-freemom.blogspot.com/2012/02/food-allergy-review-what-does-severe.html

Shopping Smart: With food allergies, reading and understanding labels is key

How do you know if a packaged food contains an allergen?
Food allergies can get confusing and complicated. More than 11 million Americans suffer from food allergies; and predictions are that the incidence of food allergies is on the increase.

A recent study in the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology showed that seafood allergies are more likely to begin in adulthood, and the Journal estimates that 6.5 million Americans have a seafood allergy today.

Just eight food groups account for 90 percent of allergic reactions. These include peanuts, tree nuts (walnuts, pecans, etc.), fish, shellfish, eggs, milk, soy and wheat. There are myriad other things that can cause allergies for some people, including food additives such as aspartame or sulfites.

Click to read more about these food groups and help ordering at a restaurant.

Source: http://www.suntimes.com/lifestyles/food/10510866-423/shopping-smart-with-food-allergies-reading-and-understanding-labels-is-key.html#.TzrlmySrJNQ.wordpress

Skin Allergy Symptoms and Management

Allergy Asthma Zone!

Skin allergy symptoms are important to identify and to differentiate from skin infections. Though the symptoms are often similar, treatment of an infection can be very different from management and control of a skin allergy.

Identifying a skin allergy is important because a lot of the same symptoms could be produced by infections, heat, and inflammation and even as a reaction to prescription drugs. For instance skin allergy symptoms such as eczema can mimic those of psoriasis, which is not an allergic reaction but caused by a disorder that produces more skin cells than needed.

Click to learn more about symptoms of a skin allergy:

To test for allergies safely at home, we recommend MyAllergyTest.

Reference: http://www.allergyasthmazone.com/allergy/skin-allergy-symptoms-and-management/